Consider The Squash – 4

Consider The Squash - 4
“The English word “squash” derives from askutasquash (a green thing eaten raw), a word from the Narragansett language, which was documented by Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, in his 1643 publication A Key Into the Language of America. Similar words for squash exist in related languages of the Algonquian family such as Massachusett.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Avocado – 2

Consider The Avocado - 2

“The avocado is also known as an alligator pear, because of its shape, green skin, and rough texture of the Haas variety. (The Florida avocado has a shiny, smooth surface.)”

“There are more than 80 varieties of avocados. The most common is the year-round Hass avocado, whose original mother tree still stands in California.”

http://www.webmd.com

Consider The Passion Fruit – 1

Consider The Dragon Fruit - 1
“These fruits are commonly known in English as “dragon fruit”, reflecting its vernacular Asian names. These include the Malay buah naga (lit. dragon fruit), the Khmer sror kaa neak (dragon scale), the Thai kaeo mangkon (dragon crystal), the Lao maak manggohn, the Vietnamese thanh long (green dragon), and the Chinese huǒ lóng guǒ (fire dragon fruit) or lóng zhū guǒ (dragon pearl fruit). Other vernacular names are strawberry pear or nanettika fruit.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Tomato – 11

Consider The Tomato - 11
“The confusion about ‘fruit’ and ‘vegetable’ arises because of the differences in usage between scientists and cooks. Scientifically speaking, a tomato is definitely a fruit. True fruits are developed from the ovary in the base of the flower, and contain the seeds of the plant (though cultivated forms may be seedless). Blueberries, raspberries, and oranges are true fruits, and so are many kinds of nut. Some plants have a soft part which supports the seeds and is also called a ‘fruit’, though it is not developed from the ovary: the strawberry is an example.”

“As far as cooking is concerned, some things which are strictly fruits, such as tomatoes or bean pods, may be called ‘vegetables’ because they are used in savoury rather than sweet cooking. The term ‘vegetable’ is more generally used of other edible parts of plants, such as cabbage leaves, celery stalks, and potato tubers, which are not strictly the fruit of the plant from which they come. Occasionally the term ‘fruit’ may be used to refer to a part of a plant which is not a fruit, but which is used in sweet cooking: rhubarb, for example.”

http://oxforddictionaries.com

Consider The Pepper – 5

Consider The Pepper - 5

“The Spanish conquistadores soon became aware of the culinary properties of chilli and brought it back to Europe, together with cocoa, potatoes, sweet potatoes, tobacco, maize, beans and turkeys. They also brought it to the Spanish Philipinnes colonies, whence it spread to Asia. The Portuguese brought them to their African and Asiatic possessions like India.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Tomato – 10

Consider The Tomato - 10
“The term “Heirloom” applied to plants was apparently first used by Kent Whealy of Seed Savers Exchange, who first used “heirloom” in relation to plants in a speech he gave in Tucson in 1981. He had asked permission to use the term “heirloom” from John Withee, who had used the term on the cover of his bean catalog. John said sure, that he had taken it from Prof. William Hepler at the University of New Hampshire, who first used the term “heirloom” to describe some beans that friends had given him back in the 1940s.”

http://www.tomatofest.com

Consider The Apple – 3

Consider The Apple - 3
“The proverb “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”, addressing the health effects of the fruit, dates from 19th century Wales.Fruit specialist J.T. Stinson popularized this proverb during a lecture at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Watermelon – 1

Consider The Watermelon - 1
“Evidence of watermelon cultivation in the Nile Valley was found from the second millennium BC. Watermelon seeds have been found at Twelfth Dynasty sites and in the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Watermelon is also mentioned in the Bible as a food eaten by the ancient Israelites while they were in bondage in Egypt.”

Wikipedia