Consider The Onion – 11

Consider The Onion - 11
“Common onions are normally available in three colours: yellow, red, and white. Yellow onions, also called brown onions, are full-flavoured and are the onions of choice for everyday use. Yellow onions turn a rich, dark brown when caramelized and give French onion soup its sweet flavour. The red onion is a good choice for fresh use when its colour livens up the dish. It is also used in grilling and char-broiling. White onions are the traditional onions that are used in classic Mexican cuisine. They have a golden colour when cooked and a particularly sweet flavour when sautéed.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Romanesco – 3

Consider The Romanesco - 3
“Romanesco, also known as Romanesque cauliflower or Romanesco broccoli, is an edible flower bud of the species Brassica oleracea. First documented in Italy, it is light green in color. Romanesco has a striking appearance because its form is a natural approximation of a fractal. When compared to a traditional cauliflower, as a vegetable its texture is far more crunchy, and its is flavour is not as assertive, being delicate and nutty.”

Wikipedia

Consider The Squash – 4

Consider The Squash - 4
“The English word “squash” derives from askutasquash (a green thing eaten raw), a word from the Narragansett language, which was documented by Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, in his 1643 publication A Key Into the Language of America. Similar words for squash exist in related languages of the Algonquian family such as Massachusett.”

Wikipedia

Ginger


My partner returned from the Farmer’s Market with many of the usual suspects today; beets, rutabaga and greens to name a few. She did include a “special” photographic project for me, a ginger bud. We put it to work almost immediately.

Consider The Cabbage


From Wikipedia we learn that, “Jacques Cartier first brought cabbage to the Americas in 1541–42, and it was probably planted in what is now the United States by the early colonists, despite the lack of written evidence of its existence there until the mid-17th century. By the 18th century, it was commonly planted by both colonists and native American Indians.”